Choosing the right installer

The following page will give you detailed installation instructions. It will actually give you two sets of detailed installation instructions because Debian itself offers at least two ways to install the system. (It does, in fact, offer more than two, but for now, two should be plenty).

When you boot from the installer media, you will be greeted by a GRUB menu, where you can choose what you want to do. The two options that are interesting for us now are Graphical install (1), which will probably not at all surprisingly, bring you to the graphical installer, and Install (2), which will bring you to the CLI installer, with a pseudo-graphical interface.

Choose your installer

The two installers are essentially the same, under the hood they do the same thing, but the user interfaces are distinct enough to include both in their own separate tabs, so that you would be less confused about it. Or more confused. It's really up to you how confused you get.

If your PC uses (U)EFI firmware but came pre-installed with e.g. Window$ 7 in "legacy BIOS mode" (it happened with older implementations), you will not be able to boot your Window$ installation if you install Debian in EFI mode. The installer will detect this, and offer you to run in non-EFI mode, which is what you should do if you want to keep Window$ for dual booting purposes.

For a more detailed discussion, please refer to the official Debian manual's corresponding chapter

Tabs, and accordions

Of course, we are not tipping a French musician after having paid for our drinks in a bar. Although we could theoretically do that, we do not really like the sound of the accordion and said French musician was playing really badly. And not our favourite tunes either. So we do not tip him. Although we still pay our tab, because we want to come to this bar again, hoping that next time there will be some better performance.

On the following page, you will find two tabs. One will be for the graphical installer, the other for the CLI version. Mostly only the screenshots representing each step would differ, but as already stated, they are probably worth differentiating properly. Which one you choose is up to your preference. The CLI installer is a good idea on older hardware, or if your video card needs special firmware, etc, or if, for any other reason, the graphical installer refuses to work.

Inside each tab, you will find an accordion, with collapsible sections representing each installation step, one by one, illustrated by one or more screenshot(s). You will only able to open any section, but it's probably best to go in sequence. There will also be a Collapse all button at the lower right corner of each section. This is to ensure better navigation, and that you can easily find any step, when you have multiple sections open, and once again, avoid confusion. Or be (even) more confused. Or something.

It should look something like this:

Here you would find a screenshot and a description of the first step in the graphical installer

Here you would find a screenshot and a description of the second step in the graphical installer

Here you would find a screenshot and a description of the third step in the graphical installer

Here you would find a screenshot and a description of the first step in the CLI installer

Here you would find a screenshot and a description of the second step in the CLI installer

Here you would find a screenshot and a description of the third step in the CLI installer

When you switch between tabs, the installer should remember where you've left off, but the two accordions will not be synchronised. That means if you are on the 7th step in the Graphical installer, and you switch over to CLI installer tab for any reason, you have to manually navigate to the 7th step there as well. Switching back to graphical tab, however, will still have the 7th step active, so you can continue where you left off.